Available Programs

Youth Programs

Parent Programs

Project Venture

An outdoor experiential youth development program designed primarily for 5th- to 8th-grade American Indian youth. It aims to develop the social and emotional competence that facilitates youths’ resistance to alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use. Based on traditional American Indian values such as family, learning from the natural world, spiritual awareness, service to others, and respect, Project Venture’s approach is positive and strengths based. The program is designed to foster the development of positive self-concept, effective social interaction skills, a community service ethic, an internal locus of control, and improved decision making and problem-solving skills. The central components of the program include a minimum of 20 1-hour classroom-based activities, such as problem-solving games and initiatives, conducted across the school year; weekly after-school, weekend, and summer skill-building experiential and challenge activities, such as hiking and camping; 3- to 10-day immersion summer adventure camps and wilderness treks; and community-oriented service learning and service leadership projects throughout the year. Learn more about Project Venture.

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Media Detective

A media literacy education program for 3rd- to 5th-grade students. The goal of the program is to prevent or delay the onset of underage alcohol and tobacco use by enhancing the critical thinking skills of students so they become adept in deconstructing media messages, particularly those related to alcohol and tobacco products, and by encouraging healthy beliefs and attitudes about abstaining from alcohol and tobacco use. The program consists of 10 45-minute lessons based on established models of decision making and research on the message interpretation process. Students are taught to deconstruct product advertisements by looking for five “clues”: (1) the product, (2) the target audience, (3) the ad hook, (4) the hidden message, and (5) missing information about the health-related consequences of using the product. The program uses a range of pedagogical techniques and can be adapted to a variety of classroom settings and skill levels of students. The Media Detective program kit contains the main materials needed to teach the program, including a teacher manual, poster flipchart, and CD with media examples. Individual student workbooks that accompany the activities taught in each lesson are sold separately. Also available is a comprehensive online training workshop, which provides an introduction to the theory and research underlying the program model and instructions for facilitating each program activity. Those who finish this training and successfully complete assessment tests receive certification as program teachers. Media Detective is related to Media Ready, a media literacy education program for 6th- to 8th-grade students. Learn more about Media Detective.

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Teen Intervene

A brief, early intervention program for 12- to 19-year-olds who display the early stages of alcohol or drug involvement. Integrating stages of change theory, motivational enhancement, and cognitive-behavioral therapy, the intervention aims to help teens reduce and ultimately eliminate their substance use.

The program is typically administered in an outpatient, school, or juvenile detention setting by a trained professional in three 1-hour sessions conducted 10 days apart. During session 1, an individual session with the adolescent, the therapist elicits information about the adolescent’s substance use and related consequences, examines the costs and benefits of the substance use, and helps the adolescent set goals of behavior change, including goals to reduce or eliminate substance use. In session 2, the therapist assesses the adolescent’s progress, discusses strategies for overcoming barriers, and negotiates the adolescent’s continued work toward meeting goals. Session 3 is an individual counseling session with the teenager’s parent (or guardian); this session addresses parent-child communication and discipline practices, and specific ways for the parent to support the child’s goals. The third session also includes a brief wrap-up conversation with the parent and adolescent. Learn more about Teen Intervene.

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Media Ready

A media literacy education program for 6th- to 8th-grade students. The goal of the program is to prevent or delay the onset of underage alcohol and tobacco use by encouraging healthy beliefs and attitudes about abstaining from alcohol and tobacco use and by enhancing the ability to apply critical thinking skills in interpreting media messages, particularly those related to alcohol and tobacco products. Media Ready consists of 10 45-minute lessons based on established models of decision making and research on the message interpretation process. The program includes homework and extension assignments to further students’ understanding of media literacy and to provide additional opportunities for practicing newly learned skills. The curriculum is adaptable to a variety of classroom settings and skill levels of students. The Media Ready program kit contains all materials needed to teach the program, including a teacher manual, poster, and CD with media examples. Also available is a comprehensive 1-day training workshop, which provides an introduction to the theory and research underlying the program model and instructions for facilitating each program activity. Those who successfully complete an online test at the end of this training receive certification of completion. Media Ready is related to Media Detective, a media literacy education program for 3rd- to 5th-grade students. Learn more about Media Ready.

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Positive Action

An integrated and comprehensive program that is designed to improve academic achievement; school attendance; and problem behaviors such as substance use, violence, suspensions, disruptive behaviors, dropping out, and sexual behavior. It is also designed to improve parent-child bonding, family cohesion, and family conflict. Positive Action has materials for schools, homes, and community agencies. All materials are based on the same unifying broad concept (one feels good about oneself when taking positive actions) with six explanatory subconcepts (positive actions for the physical, intellectual, social, and emotional areas) that elaborate on the overall theme. The program components include grade-specific curriculum kits for kindergarten through 12th grade, drug education kits, a conflict resolution kit, sitewide climate development kits for elementary and secondary school levels, a counselor’s kit, a family kit, and a community kit. All the components and their parts can be used separately or in any combination and are designed to reinforce and support one another. Learn more about Positive Action.

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Project ALERT

A school-based prevention program for middle or junior high school students that focuses on alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use. It seeks to prevent adolescent nonusers from experimenting with these drugs, and to prevent youths who are already experimenting from becoming more regular users or abusers. Based on the social influence model of prevention, the program is designed to help motivate young people to avoid using drugs and to teach them the skills they need to understand and resist prodrug social influences. The curriculum is comprised of 11 lessons in the first year and 3 lessons in the second year. Lessons involve small-group activities, question-and-answer sessions, role-playing, and the rehearsal of new skills to stimulate students’ interest and participation. The content focuses on helping students understand the consequences of drug use, recognize the benefits of nonuse, build norms against use, and identify and resist prodrug pressures. Learn more about Project ALERT.

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Second Step

A classroom-based social-skills program for children 4 to 14 years of age that teaches socioemotional skills aimed at reducing impulsive and aggressive behavior while increasing social competence. The program builds on cognitive behavioral intervention models integrated with social learning theory, empathy research, and social information-processing theories. The program consists of in-school curricula, parent training, and skill development. Second Step teaches children to identify and understand their own and others’ emotions, reduce impulsiveness and choose positive goals, and manage their emotional reactions and decisionmaking process when emotionally aroused. The curriculum is divided into two age groups: preschool through 5th grade (with 20 to 25 lessons per year) and 6th through 9th grade (with 15 lessons in year 1 and 8 lessons in the following 2 years). Each curriculum contains five teaching kits that build sequentially and cover empathy, impulse control, and anger management in developmentally and age-appropriate ways. Group decisionmaking, modeling, coaching, and practice are demonstrated in the Second Step lessons using interpersonal situations presented in photos or video format. Learn more about Second Step.

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Project Towards No Drug Abuse (Project TND)

A drug use prevention program for high school youth. The current version of the curriculum is designed to help students develop self-control and communication skills, acquire resources that help them resist drug use, improve decision making strategies, and develop the motivation to not use drugs. It is packaged in 12 40-minute interactive sessions to be taught by teachers or health educators. The TND curriculum was developed for high-risk students in continuation or alternative high schools. It has also been tested among traditional high school students. Learn more about Project Towards No Drug Abuse.

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Safe Dates

A program designed to stop or prevent the initiation of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse on dates or between individuals involved in a dating relationship. Intended for male and female 8th- and 9th-grade students, the goals of the program include: (1) changing adolescent dating violence and gender-role norms, (2) improving peer help-giving and dating conflict-resolution skills, (3) promoting victim and perpetrator beliefs in the need for help and seeking help through the community resources that provide it, and (4) decreasing dating abuse victimization and perpetration. Safe Dates consists of five components: a nine-session curriculum, a play script, a poster contest, parent materials, and a teacher training outline. In some studies, the program incorporated a booster session. Learn more about Safe Dates.

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Strengthening Families

The Strengthening Families Program (SFP) is a Prevention Program through ARP offered to parents who are caring for a child between the ages of 6 and 14. The program was developed to serve many different types of families and has been highly effective in improving parent-child relationships.

SFP meets once a week for 11 to 14 weeks. Each meeting consists of separate one-hour parent and child skills training classes, followed by a session in which individual families work together on the skills they are learning. Learn more about Strengthening Family Program.

Parents Learn:

  • Effective use of attention and rewards
  • Clear and consistent communication
  • Useful discipline techniques
  • Ways to problem solve
  • How to set limits
  • To cooperate with other family members

Families Work Together To:

  • Increase cooperation
  • Improve communication skills
  • Plan and organize family activities
  • Talk about sensitive issues and family concerns

Children Learn:

  • To identify and express their feelings
  • To resist drugs and alcohol
  • Problem solving skills

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Children in Between (CIB)

This program is formerly known as Children in the Middle, an educational intervention for divorcing families that aims to reduce the parental conflict, loyalty pressures, and communication problems that can place significant stress on children. CIB consists of one to two 90- to 120-minute classroom sessions and can be tailored to meet specific needs. The intervention teaches specific parenting skills, particularly good communication skills, to reduce the familial conflict experienced by children. Each parent attending classes typically receives two booklets (“What About the Children” and “Children in Between”) that give advice for reducing the stress of divorce/separation on children and promote practice of the skills taught in the course. Each parent also watches the intervention video, which illustrates how children often feel caught in the middle of their parents’ conflicts. Learn more about Children in Between.

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Nurturing Parent Programs (NPP)

Family-based programs for the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect. The programs were developed to help families who have been identified by child welfare agencies for past child abuse and neglect or who are at high risk for child abuse and neglect. The goals of NPP are to:

  • Increase parents’ sense of self-worth, personal empowerment, empathy, bonding, and attachment.
  • Increase the use of alternative strategies to harsh and abusive disciplinary practices.
  • Increase parents’ knowledge of age-appropriate developmental expectations.
  • Reduce abuse and neglect rates.

NPP instruction is based on psychoeducational and cognitive-behavioral approaches to learning and focuses on “re-parenting,” or helping parents learn new patterns of parenting to replace their existing, learned, abusive patterns. By completing questionnaires and participating in discussion, role-play, and audiovisual exercises, participants learn how to nurture themselves as individuals and in turn build their nurturing family and parenting skills as dads, moms, sons, and daughters. Participants develop their awareness, knowledge, and skills in five areas: (1) age-appropriate expectations; (2) empathy, bonding, and attachment; (3) nonviolent nurturing discipline; (4) self-awareness and self-worth; and (5) empowerment, autonomy, and healthy independence. Participating families attend sessions either at home or in a group format with other families. Group sessions combine concurrent separate experiences for parents and children with shared “family nurturing time.” In home-based sessions, parents and children meet separately and jointly during a 90-minute lesson once per week for 15 weeks.

Two group facilitators are recommended for every seven adults participating in the program. Two additional group facilitators are recommended for every 10 children participating. NPP can be implemented by professionals or paraprofessionals in fields such as social work, education, recreation, and psychology who have undergone NPP facilitator training and have related experience. Learn more about Nurturing Parent Programs.

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Triple P (PPP) Positive Parenting Program

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